Questioning the postwar consensus thesis
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Questioning the postwar consensus thesis towards an alternative account by James D. Marlow

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Published by Dartmouth Pub. Co. in Aldershot, Hants, England, Brookfield, Vt .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Great Britain

Subjects:

  • Consensus (Social sciences),
  • Great Britain -- Economic policy -- 1945-1964.,
  • Great Britain -- Economic policy -- 1964-1979.,
  • Great Britain -- Economic policy -- 1979-1997.,
  • Great Britain -- Social policy.,
  • Great Britain -- Politics and government -- 1945-

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 164-175) and index.

StatementJames D. Marlow.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHC256.5 .M3928 1996
The Physical Object
Paginationvi, 178 p. ;
Number of Pages178
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL974813M
ISBN 101855218267
LC Control Number96011809

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Questioning the postwar consensus thesis: towards an alternative account, a different understanding Author: Marlow, J. D. ISNI: Awarding Body: University of Essex Current Institution: University of Essex Date of Award: Questioning the postwar consensus thesis Towards an alternative account, a different understanding. By J Marlow. Abstract. SIGLEAvailable from British Library Document Supply Centre- DSC:DX / BLDSC - British Library Document Supply CentreGBUnited KingdoAuthor: J Marlow. The postwar consensus: an enduring thesis 67 The consensus 'debate' 69 Aiming short of the target: why the consensus thesis has endured 71 Broadening our focus 74 Revising the consensus debate 76 The confiictual character of British politics in the postwar period 83 Conclusion 85 4 Crisis and Political Development in Postwar Britain 87 Colin Hay. The decline of consensus politics under Margaret Thatcher coupled with the opening of archival material related to post-war policymaking, led some to question whether a post-war consensus had ever.

SAGE Video Bringing teaching, learning and research to life. SAGE Books The ultimate social sciences digital library. SAGE Reference The complete guide for your research journey. SAGE Navigator The essential social sciences literature review tool. SAGE Business Cases Real world cases at your fingertips. CQ Press Your definitive resource for politics, policy and people. Since the lates, scholars have been engaged in a vibrant debate about the nature of post-war British politics. While some writers have suggested that the three decades that succeeded the Second World War witnessed a bi-partisan consensus on key policy questions, others have argued that it was conflict, not agreement, that marked the period. This article offers a novel contribution to this.   Buy Questioning the Postwar Consensus Thesis: Towards an Alternative Account by Marlow, James D. (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : James D. Marlow. The term ‘post-war consensus’ is used to describe a period of general agreement in the key areas of politics between the two main political parties following the Second World War. Prior to the Conservative election, Labour had introduced several important social and political reforms.

  In its former life, the ‘postwar’ consensus thesis has been utilised in order to emphasise both major parties' re-orientation, immediately after the war, to the concerns of presiding over a universalist welfare state system and mixed economy whilst balancing the priorities of full employment and the integration of trade unions into the.   The State, the People, and Social Cohesion in Post-War Britain (Cheltenham, ). 62 Titmuss was a central figure, but of course not the only one, in this endeavor. 63 A good summary of this debate, by a recent contributor to it, is found in Mackay, Robert, Half the Battle: Civilian Morale in Britain during the Second World War (Manchester. It argues that once these beliefs are considered, it becomes possible to reconcile some of the competing claims made by proponents and critics of the ‘post-war consensus’ thesis. Abstract. Since the lates, scholars have been engaged in a vibrant debate about the nature of post-war British politics. While some writers have suggested that the three decades that succeeded the Second World War witnessed a bi-partisan consensus on key policy questions, others have argued that it was conflict, not agreement, that marked the period.